Volume 15 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the International Cancer Imaging Society (ICIS) 15th Annual Teaching Course

Open Access

FDG-PET/CT pitfalls in gynecological and genitourinary oncological imaging

  • A Lakhani1Email author,
  • S Khan1,
  • N Bharwani1,
  • V Stewart1,
  • A Rockall1,
  • T Barwick1 and
  • S Khan1
Cancer Imaging201515(Suppl 1):P42

https://doi.org/10.1186/1470-7330-15-S1-P42

Published: 2 October 2015

Learning objectives

1. To understand the role of FDG PET/CT imaging in the multimodality investigation of gynecological and genitourinary cancers.

2. To describe the mechanism of action and technical pitfalls of FDG-PET/CT.

3. To highlight key imaging features of physiological and non-physiological FDG uptake and show how this is essential for interpretation of gynecological and genitourinary FDG-PET/CT studies.

4. to review the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to potentially false-positive and false-negative assessments.

Content organisation

Introduction of FDG-PET/CT
  • ° Mechanism of action

  • ° Role in gynecological and genitourinary oncological imaging

  • ° FDG-PET/CT imaging protocols

False positives in gynecological and genitourinary oncological imaging:

Physiological FDG-PET uptake – pictorial examples of uptake in endometrium and ovaries

Non-physiological FDG-PET uptake – pictorial examples of pelvic inflammatory disease, fibroids, endometriosis

False negatives in gynecological and genitourinary oncological imaging:

Physiological FDG-PET uptake – pictorial examples of urinary excretion masking malignant lesions

No/low FDG uptake – pictorial examples of necrotic lymphadenopathy and low grade tumours

Artefacts

Pearls explaining how to minimise false interpretation

Conclusion

FDG-PET/CT has a useful role in gynecological and genitourinary oncological imaging. However, understanding of physiological and non-physiological FDG- PET uptake is vital to understand potential false positive and false negatives in interpretation.

FDG PET/CT should be used as one part of the multimodality investigation of gynecological and genitourinary cancers.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Copyright

© Lakhani et al. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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