Volume 14 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the International Cancer Imaging Society (ICIS) 14th Annual Teaching Course

Open Access

What the radiologist needs to know about restaging of rectal carcinoma after chemoradiation therapy

  • ME Nazar1Email author,
  • F Grana1,
  • L Alarcon1,
  • G Caimi Romero1,
  • N Rotholtz1 and
  • EP Eyheremendy1
Cancer Imaging201414(Suppl 1):P16

https://doi.org/10.1186/1470-7330-14-S1-P16

Published: 9 October 2014

Aim

The purpose of this exhibit is to describe and compare the high-resolution MRI features of rectal carcinoma after chemoradiation treatment (CRT) and to correlate with the histologic findings after total mesorectal excision (TME).

Method

High resolution T2-W MR imaging (HRMRI) was performed in a 1.5 T unit between January 2013 and February 2014 before and immediately after CRT in the care of 25 patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum. After total mesorectal excision (TME) the piece was cut by the pathologist under the supervision of the radiologist, who indicated areas of residual tumour after neoadjuvant therapy or changes such as fibrosis, oedema, cellular and acellular mucin, desmoplastic reaction and pseudotumour appearance. Thus, initially we did a correlation between the macroscopic and MR imaging. Subsequently, we performed the same correlation but in this case between microscopy and MR imaging. Changes in morphologic and signal intensity features were evaluated with respect to primary tumour and nodal downstaging.

Summary

Emerging evidence has shown the prognostic importance of reassessing rectal cancer using HRMRI after completion of CRT. A systematic cooperation between radiologist and pathologist is essential for optimal treatment planning and patient care.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
German Hospital

Copyright

© Nazar et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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